Ovarian Cancer Patients Do Best With Dual Chemotherapy

Study shows women live longer with traditional IV chemo - plus doses in the abdomen

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A patient relaxes while undergoing dual chemotherapy treatment for advanced ovarian cancer at Ohio State`s James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute. Giving patients like Lavelle chemo through an IV, followed by a dose directly into the abdomen, has been shown to increase three year survival rates. However, a new study has found that fewer than half of women at six major academic medical centers who are eligible for the therapy are actually receiving it. Details: bit.ly/1IeIA5v

(COLUMBUS, Ohio)  – While there may not be an abundance of treatment options for women with advanced cases of ovarian cancer, a new study suggests one of the most effective forms of therapy may be grossly underused.

After undergoing surgery to remove their tumors, women who received a dual dose of chemotherapy – one in the arm, followed by another dose in the abdomen – saw their three-year survival rates jump from 71 to 81 percent.

“The problem is, when we looked at six of the largest academic medical centers in the country, we found that only 41% of women who were eligible for this treatment were getting it. That needs to change,” said Dr. David O’Malley, a gynecologic oncologist at Ohio State’s James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute.

It’s estimated nearly 22,000 women will be diagnosed with ovarian cancer this year and the majority of cases won’t be discovered until the later stages. “Most women don’t know they have ovarian cancer until it’s advanced, which is why this therapy is so important,” said O’Malley.

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A patient has a line inserted into her side during a chemotherapy treatment at Ohio State`s James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute. A new study found that a dual chemo approach, giving women with advanced ovarian cancer chemo through an IV, followed by chemo directly into the abdomen, increases survival rates. Unfortunately, the study also found less than half of women who were eligible at six large academic medical centers were getting the treatment. Details: bit.ly/1IeIA5v

A patient relaxes while undergoing dual chemotherapy treatment for advanced ovarian cancer at Ohio State`s James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute. Giving patients chemo through an IV, followed by a dose directly into the abdomen, has been shown to increase three year survival rates. However, a new study has found that fewer than half of women at six major academic medical centers who are eligible for the therapy are actually receiving it. Details: bit.ly/1IeIA5v

Dr. David O`Malley reviews a patient`s images with a nurse at Ohio State`s James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute. O`Malley participated in a study with five over leading cancer centers which found that fewer than half of women with advanced ovarian cancer who are eligible are receiving a dual chemotherapy treatment proven to increase survival rates. See how the dual approach to chemo works and why researchers are calling for more women to get it: bit.ly/1IeIA5v

Dr. David O`Malley analyzes a patient`s MRI at Ohio State`s James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute. O`Malley is part of a research team calling for more women with advanced ovarian cancer to receive a dual form of chemotherapy. The approach, which gives a dose of chemo through an IV, followed by a dose directly into the abdomen, boosts three year survival rates considerably. However, a study at six major academic medical centers shows that only 41% of women who are eligible for dual chemo are getting it. Details: bit.ly/1IeIA5v

Terry Wiencek waters flowers at her home in Powell, OH. After being diagnosed with advanced ovarian cancer, Wiencek opted for a dual form of chemotherapy, in which one dose is given through an IV, followed by a dose directly into the abdomen. A new study shows the dual chemo approach significantly improves survival rates, but is being underutilized. At six of the largest academic medical centers in the U.S., only 41% of women who are eligible for the therapy are getting it. See why that matters here: bit.ly/1IeIA5v