Surgery Allows Women To Give Birth After Cancer

More women giving birth over 30 - just when cervical cancer rates jump

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Danielle Hargraves of Zanesville, OH, gave birth to her daughter, Lilly, after surviving cervical cancer. Doctors at Ohio State`s James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute and Comprehensive Cancer Center were able to perform a type of fertility-sparing surgery that allowed Danielle to get pregnant and carry her baby to nearly full term. Details on the surgery here: bit.ly/15t64Xy

(COLUMBUS, Ohio) October 2013 –  More women than ever are choosing to have babies over the age of 30, and for some, that creates medical challenges. The risk of cervical cancer tends to steadily climb past the age of 30 as well, meaning more doctors are now having to simultaneously treat cancer, while working to preserve a woman’s womb.

“Cervical cancer patients can be quite young, often women in their 30’s, so fertility is still very much a priority for them,” said Jeffrey Fowler, MD, gynecologic oncologist at The Ohio State Comprehensive Cancer Center – James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute.

“More and more we have to treat these women for cancer today, while protecting their ability to give birth in the future.”

To do that, Fowler says he is performing more surgeries known as a radical trachelectomy. Unlike traditional hysterectomies, these procedures only require a fraction of a woman’s tissue to be removed, and preserves her ability to get pregnant after therapy.

“For women who qualify, it can be the best of both worlds, and that’s what we aiming for,” he said.

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Danielle Hargraves of Zanesville, OH, gave birth to her daughter, Lilly, after surviving cervical cancer. Doctors at Ohio State`s James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute and Comprehensive Cancer Center were able to perform a type of fertility-sparing surgery that allowed Danielle to get pregnant and carry her baby to nearly full term. Details on the surgery here: bit.ly/15t64Xy

Even after treatment for cervical cancer, Danielle Hargraves of Zanesville, OH was able to become pregnant and deliver her daughter Lilly. More women are opting to have children over the age of 30, a time when the risk of cervical cancer begins to climb. Doctors at Ohio State`s James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute and Comprehensive Cancer Center are taking steps to treat their cancer while protecting a woman`s womb. Details here: bit.ly/15t64Xy

After being diagnosed with cervical cancer, Danielle Hargraves of Zanesville, OH thought she may never be able to have another baby. But thanks to a special surgical technique at Ohio State`s James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute and Comprehensive Cancer Center, doctors were able to preserve Danielle`s fertility. Three years after her diagnosis of cervical cancer, she is a mother for the second time. Details on her story here: bit.ly/15t64Xy

Doctor Jeffrey Fowler, MD, specializes in treating women for cervical cancer while preserving their ability to get pregnant after therapy. Fowler is part of a team at Ohio State`s James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute and Comprehensive Cancer Center that performs a special fertility-sparing operation known as a radical trachelectomy. Details on the procedure here: bit.ly/15t64Xy

In the past, women with cervical cancer were either treated with radiation of the pelvis or had hysterectomies to remove their reproductive organs. Both approaches meant they could never give birth again. But doctors at Ohio State`s James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute and Comprehensive Cancer Center offer a different approach. Doctor Jeffrey Fowler, MD, performs a less invasive type of surgery known as a radical trachelectomy, designed to get rid of a woman`s cervical cancer but preserve her ability to become pregnant later in life. Details here: bit.ly/15t64Xy

Many women diagnosed with cervical cancer assume they will never be able to become pregnant again. But that`s not always the case. At Ohio State`s James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute and Comprehensive Cancer Center, Dr. Jeffrey Fowler, MD conducts a type of surgery designed to both treat a woman`s cancer and protect her womb. Fowler says more women than ever are having babies over the age of 30, just as cervical cancer risks begin to climb. Details on the procedure here: bit.ly/15t64Xy